lunes, 8 de junio de 2009

HUMAN RIGHTS FIRST


human rights first

Defender Alert

Release Ill Cuban Activist from Isolation Cell

Tony Diaz, an instrumental organizer of a civic initiative known as the Varela Project in Cuba, was thrown in jail for his human rights activities in the spring of 2003.  The Varela Project was collected petition signatures for a constitutional referendum on democratic reforms and respect for basic freedoms. Now, more than six years later, Diaz suffers from serious intestinal problems.  This week, Diaz was transferred to a prison isolation cell, seriously endangering his health.

For the past eight months, Diaz has been receiving treatment for his illness at the Carlos J. Finlay Military Hospital in Havana.  During his stay, State Security agents repeatedly offered to transfer Diaz to a prison close to his home if he agreed to fully cooperate with them and wear a certain uniform.  Upon his refusal, he was transferred this past week to an isolation cell in Canaleta prison in Ciego de Avila province, more than 500 km away from his home in Havana. His detention consists of a dark and humid cell with no outside communication. Demand that he be released from the isolation cell and receive the medical care that he needs.

Click Here to Take Action

Click Here to Learn More About This Case

Alert Date: June 8, 2009


Visit the web address below to tell your friends about this important case.
Tell-a-friend!

If you received this message from a friend, you can sign up for Human Rights First.

This message was sent to david2305@yahoo.es. Visit your subscription management pageto modify your email communication preferences or update your personal profile. To stop receiving Defender Alert Network, click to unsubscribe. To stop ALL email from Human Rights First, click to remove yourself from our lists (or reply via email with "remove or unsubscribe" in the subject line).

 

If you prefer plain text emails, please click here

Human Rights First,
333 Seventh Avenue,
13th Floor
New York, NY 10001-5004
www.humanrightsfirst.org